The Soloist

Are You a Solo?

Answer yes if you are:

 

  • Age 50 or older
  • Currently single (widowed, divorced, separated, never married, or don’t have a life partner)
  • Don’t have adult children who could provide help as you age, when needed.

 

The Soloist is a Newsletter that Addresses Your Needs

 

As Solos grow older, they need a plan for realizing their hopes, meeting their needs, and dealing with the challenges that often come with aging.

 

That’s true for anyone, but it’s especially important when you’re a Solo. If you don’t have a plan, other people will have to make decisions for you, without any clue as to your preferences or wishes.

 

Welcome to The Soloist, a newsletter from Davis Financial Group, where we share information, expertise, interviews, and stories to help Solos live well, take good care of themselves, and make wise choices for their future.

 

SUBSCRIBE TO THE SOLOIST!

By Mary B. Young, D.B.A. Most of us drag our heels when it comes to estate-planning.  It simmers quietly on the back burner, muffled by more immediate issues. Whether we’re Solos, married, and/or have children, we’re seldom eager to contemplate our own mortality. After age 60, people are more likely to seek...

By Mary Young, D.B.A. Who will take care of me when I’m old?  It’s a question that haunts many Solos. Some may push these thoughts out of their minds because, without a spouse, partner, or adult child, they see no obvious answer. Other Solos are joining the growing ranks of “Proactive...

In our ongoing research on Solos, we often come across worthwhile articles we think you’ll find useful. Here’s an initial batch. We’ll pass along others from time to time in future issues of The Soloist.   Single? No Kids? Don’t Fret: How to Plan Care in Your Later Years Susan B. Garland, The...

By Mary B. Young, D.B.A.  Flip through any issue of AARP Magazine and you’ll see a recommended to-do list for older adults: Choose a healthcare proxy, get an estate plan and a durable power of attorney, document your end-of-life wishes, write down your emergency contacts.  In addition, it’s good to have...

By Allen Davis, CFP More than two-thirds of singles do not have a financial advisor, according to a recent survey. In fact, they are more than twice as likely as marrieds to say they hadn’t spoken to anyone at all about retirement.[1] Yet it’s particularly important to get started on financial planning...

Rebecca A. Clay, “COVID-19 Isn’t Just a Threat to Older People’s Physical Health,” American Psychological Association, March 18, 2020. Rebecca Tuhus-Dubrow, “Are Women Better at Living Alone?” Slate, February 3, 2012. Melissa Hawkins, “Carefully Forming a ‘Quarantine Bubble’ Can Fight Loneliness,” “NextAvenue”, July 24, 2020. Caroline Kitchener, “A Woman...

by Mary B. Young “COVID has made me think a lot more about aging alone,” a 60-year-old widow told me. Her wife had died six years ago; they had no children. Although she has since found a new partner, she’s learned from experience that relationships don’t always last—especially as we age....

By Allen Davis, CFP, ChFC Strictly speaking, solos are defined as adults age 65 or older who have neither a spouse/partner nor adult children to support them as they age. But Solos are a varied bunch. The complexities of real life, real people, and real families produce a lot of diversity...